Home

E-commerce tips in times of corona
The coronavirus pandemic affects companies in different ways. From loss of turnover to remote working, during the COVID-19 outbreak things change quickly and companies have to adapt continuously. The e-commerce business may be more important now than it was before the crisis. Organizations that don’t have an online channel face great difficulties in marketing their products. On the other hand, we see the online environments in the food sector, which can barely handle the flow of orders. In this blog we have listed the most important tips and supplemented them with practical advice.

On various websites tips are given to generate turnover from your online sales channel in these uncertain times. This blog offers you an overview of the most important tips and advice from, among others, Jan Cortenbach, e-commerce director at Charlie Templeen Jeroen Sonneveld, e-business manager at Advion. https://b2bgids.be/ – https://adressen.be/

Tip 1: respond to a changing audience
At Charlie Temple (online eyewear store) they see an increase in new customers. This means a new target group that has a different need. For them, buying online is an even bigger threshold than for the old target group, so taking away worries is very important. This can be done by emphasizing your USP’s (Unique Selling Points) even more or by highlighting the possibility to pay afterwards. In addition, Charlie Temple has decided to speed up the rollout of the card packages. This will allow customers to fit a few frames at home before they order their new glasses.

 

Fig. 1 – Extra emphasis on the USPs with 100 days reflection period

Tip 2: extend your return period
Consumers now wonder all the more if and how they can return their order. For example, are the parcel points still open and can you still go outside? Returning a parcel within 14 days can be difficult. Remove this threshold with the consumer and temporarily offer a longer return period in order to be able to serve your customer even better. At Hornbach you see a good example that clearly communicates this change. Both for the consumer (30 days) and the business customer (90 days), the return terms have been adjusted.

klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik

Fig. 2 – Hornbach has extended its return period to 90 days for the business customer.

Tip 3: show your product stock and delivery time
At Advion, supplier of personal protective equipment such as disinfection, hand soaps, gloves and mouth caps, the demand for products has increased exponentially in recent weeks. Insight into product statuses is now more important than ever: avoid disappointment for your customer relationship by being clear about current stock and delivery options. This ultimately saves you a lot of time for solving customer questions and postponing delivery times. Not only do you avoid “no-sales”; you also avoid many questions to your service desk about availability and delivery time. Clear insights and communication is the key, especially if you operate in a market with personal protective equipment for vital professions.

 

Fig. 3 – Advion shows for each product whether the product is in stock and/or available.

Tip 4: communicate clearly to your visitor/customer
Be immediately clear in your communication on the website. Use a banner or an extra pop-up message in which you immediately draw attention to the measures related to the coronavirus. In this way you create trust with the customer to continue making purchases at your store even in these uncertain times. What precautions do you take to keep your products, packaging, stores and staff safe? What delivery possibilities and flexibility can you offer? What are the measures to visit a store safely? It is important to listen carefully to your customer care department so that you know what questions customers really have.

 

Fig. 4 – HEMA offers a clear page where all the measures are listed.

Tip 5: improve internal processes
Are you active in a market where the current circumstances are calmer? Use this period to improve processes. Even though everyone works from home, it’s very easy to consult each other digitally or train each other. Think up and build (digital) solutions together with the teams where there are common problems. An example is your online FAQ, a standard place for your visitors to find answers to questions. But when’s the last time you’ll have these answered?

Tip 6: act ethically
Offer only what you have on the floor. You see through (social) media a rise of cowboys that respond to the current circumstances. If you look further, it often turns out that nothing is available. This is an easy way to create awareness and traffic in no time, but don’t do this at all. klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik klik

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

In 2007 wilde Steve Chou’s vrouw, Jennifer, meer tijd doorbrengen met hun groeiende familie. Dus nam ze ontslag. De Chous lanceerde Bumblebee Linens, een door osCommerce aangedreven online winkel. Steve, een voormalige microprocessor-ingenieur, richtte zich op de technologie- en marketingkant van het bedrijf. Jennifer leidde de activiteiten.

Fast forward naar 2020, en Bumblebee Linens is een zeven-cijferig e-commerce bedrijf dat zakdoeken, servetten en andere doekproducten verkoopt. Steve is nu een e-commerce beroemdheid, na de lancering van de “My Wife Quit Her Job” blog, podcast en YouTube kanaal, die gezamenlijk educatieve inhoud voor huidige en aspirant-ondernemers publiceert.

Ik heb onlangs met Steve gesproken over de ecommerce business van de Chou, zijn “My Wife” content portals, en, ja, de realiteit van het gebruik van osCommerce in 2020. Wat volgt is ons hele audio gesprek en een transcript, bewerkt voor de duidelijkheid en lengte.

Steve Chou: Mijn vrouw en ik zijn onze ecommerce winkel begonnen met het verkopen van zakdoeken online. Ze wilde een zakdoek voor foto’s. Kon er geen vinden. Uiteindelijk vond ze deze Chinese fabrikant, importeerde een bosje, gebruikte er misschien zes of zo, verkocht de rest op eBay. Ze gingen als een soort hotcakes. Toen, later, wilde ze thuisblijven bij de kinderen. We kwamen terug in contact met die verkoper en lanceerden onze winkel, Bumblebee Linens, in 2007.

Bandholz: Dat was ongeveer toen Shopify begon. Je had toen Magento, osCommerce, Yahoo.

Chou: Het grote, volledig gehoste platform was Yahoo. Maar ik ben een open-source man omdat ik een ingenieur ben. Ik wil alle broncode. Dus gingen we voor osCommerce. We zitten nog steeds op osCommerce, geloof het of niet.

Bandholz: Hoeveel hoofdpijn is dat geweest?

Chou: Niet slecht. Elke vijf jaar of zo, doe ik een grote update. Het is leuk om functionaliteit toe te voegen aan de winkel. De meeste tools hebben nu een API. Als ik me op een middag verveel, dan start ik er een op en voeg ik een nieuwe functie toe.

Bandholz: Wordt het platform nog steeds ondersteund?

Chou: Dat is een goede vraag. Ik weet het niet zeker. Op een gegeven moment, ging ik door bijna elke regel van de code. Ik zou op een gegeven moment graag willen switchen. Maar ik wil niet al mijn zoekverkeer verliezen. Ik heb verschillende vrienden gehad die naar verschillende platformen zijn overgestapt en de helft van hun verkeer zijn kwijtgeraakt. Het is te riskant.

Maar onze zaak staat niet op de automatische piloot. Ik voeg voortdurend dingen toe. Dit jaar heb ik sms’jes toegevoegd. Een paar jaar geleden was het Facebook Messenger – het ontwikkelen van stromen voor giveaways, loyaliteitsprogramma’s, en dat soort dingen. Als er een nieuwe technologie uitkomt, probeer ik het.

Op een gegeven moment zal iets me dwingen om de kogel door te bijten en te schakelen. Het is gewoon nog niet zover.

Bandholz. Wat zoek je?

Chou: Ik ben op dit moment op zoek naar niets, daarom ben ik niet gewisseld. Het is goed. Het is een zeven-cijferige winkel. Maar tegenwoordig gebruik ik het als een laboratorium. Dus als er iets nieuws uitkomt, probeer ik het op de winkel en dan schrijf ik erover op de blog en rapporteer ik de werkelijke cijfers. Ik ben volledig transparant. Ik denk niet dat iemand binnenkort een zakdoekwinkel zal sluiten.

Bandholz: De wedstrijd is non-stop voor Beardbrand.

Chou: Jouw markt is veel groter dan de mijne. We hebben bruiloften en een subgroep van oudere klanten die zakdoeken verzamelen.

Bandholz: Wat is het krijgen van de meeste tractie op de winkel deze dagen?

Chou: SMS is geweldig. Het is het volgende grote ding. Onze functionaliteit is op dit punt erg basaal. Ik heb berichten op mijn site om bezoekers aan te moedigen een speciaal woord te sms’en naar een nummer en gratis spullen te ontvangen. Ik heb een spin-to-win popup waar deelnemers de prijs via SMS moeten inwisselen. Wanneer mensen een bestelling plaatsen, krijgen ze een SMS. Dan stuur ik speciale aanbiedingen.

We doen een maandelijkse flash verkoop. We doen andere verkopen, en we sturen inhoud – dat soort dingen. Wat ik leuk vind aan SMS zijn gesprekken. Ik heb veel bestellingen opgeslagen via SMS. Mensen hebben een vraag, en wij geven een antwoord. Het is natuurlijk voor hen om te antwoorden. Dan kunnen we een gesprek opzetten versus een e-mail waar mensen niet direct een antwoord verwachten.

Voor ons is een sms-abonnee vijf tot acht keer meer waard dan één op een e-mail.

Bandholz: Verander het onderwerp, ben je in overeenstemming met wat er gaande is met Shopify, BigCommerce en andere platformen?

Chou: Dat ben ik. Ik moet op de hoogte blijven. Ik probeer SaaS-kosten te vermijden. Als ik in het weekend een functie kan coderen, dan doe ik dat. Ik heb ontdekt, in het algemeen, dat sommige SaaS-bedrijven (buiten de e-commerce-platforms om) functionaliteit bieden die de moeite niet waard is. Kleine dingen zoals popups of wat dan ook, die kan ik meestal vrij snel coderen.

Bandholz: Wat doe je nog meer? Je hebt een YouTube-kanaal.

Chou: Ja. Het heet “My Wife Quit Her Job”, dezelfde naam als mijn blog. Ik ben tot 17.000 abonnees. Ik begon er zes maanden geleden serieus werk van te maken. Ik weet nog steeds niet wat ik doe, dus ik kan er geen commentaar op geven. Ik was van plan om je er naar te laten kijken en me suggesties te geven.

Bandholz: Praat me erdoor. Ik hoor graag van ondernemers die hun tenen op YouTube zetten.

Chou: Als ik mensen mijn video’s kan laten bekijken, is de kans groot dat ze mijn blog bezoeken en mijn cursussen of een affiliate product kopen. Ik blogg al 11 jaar en podcasts al zes jaar. De meeste mensen herinneren zich mij voor mijn podcast omdat ze een uur lang naar mij luisteren. De YouTube kijkers zijn waarschijnlijk niet zo serieus als de podcast luisteraars omdat de video’s op YouTube maar een minuut of 10 duren. Maar iemand kunnen zien en horen voegt een enorme hoeveelheid diepte toe. Dus daarom doe ik het.

Bandholz: Uw “My Wife Quit Her Job” is een blog, podcast en YouTube kanaal. Hoe verdeel je je dag tussen die inhoudelijke kant en het runnen van een e-commerce bedrijf?

Chou: De ecommerce business is ongeveer twee dagen per week. De rest is My Wife Quit Her Job. Ik werk met mijn vrouw in de ecommerce winkel, maar ze is niet betrokken bij My Wife Quit Her Job, ook al heeft ze de titel geïnspireerd.

 

Tip 6: act ethically
Offer only what you have on the floor. You see through (social) media a rise of cowboys that respond to the current circumstances. If you look further, it often turns out that nothing is available. This is an easy way to create awareness and traffic in no time, but don’t do this at all. A good coordination between stock management and marketing is important in this day and age. Place relevant content only if you actually have it on the floor and you know you can solve the question. Prioritize where you want to help with limited available goods where it is most needed, 3. Prioritize relationships in e.g. healthcare and government.

Tip 7: consider product offerings on marketplaces
The rise of Amazon has been in the news a lot lately. And that’s not all. Amazon has recently indicated it is looking for 100,000 new employees in America to meet the increasing consumer demand as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. This indicates once again that the number of companies offering their products on marketplaces is rising sharply. Investigate what marketplaces (Bol.com, Zalando, Amazon, etc.) can do for you. Thuiswinkel.org also sees a significant growth in webshops that try to sell their products via social media and marketplaces. “These new online sales channels offer webshops and physical stores extra possibilities. Retailers who have become active online in recent years are the first to be able to respond flexibly to consumers who are obliged to arrange their lives from home,” says Wijnand Jongen.

“What will the world look like after the restrictions/measures have been lifted? Online food delivery has had a huge boost and supermarkets (PicNic, AH, Jumbo, etc.) have never been so busy online before. People are getting used to this way of ordering. In this sense, setting up your e-commerce activities properly is more important than ever for any SME to become a multinational.
Jeroen Sonneveld.

Tip 8: selling directly to the consumer (D2C)
Direct to consumer (D2C) brands have been creating a furore as the future of retail for several years now. Bypassing standard distribution channels and focusing on an integrated path from production to consumer, these brands have touched almost every retail outlet – from mattresses to fitness to health. Logistics are crucial. A supplier’s e-commerce platform is often not connected to direct sales channels; everything is geared to bulk deliveries to a relatively limited number of retailers and not to the fulfilment of hundreds of small orders. Inventory will change much faster and more irregularly, so D2C suppliers need real-time insight, and of course that’s what the customer wants. As consumers shift more of their spend from offline to online, D2C brands are likely to get a significant boost. Suppliers can respond to this if they have an e-commerce platform and the mindset that can handle it.

Tip 9: Offer local businesses an online platform
The time of the coronavirus calls for creative solutions. We see many good online initiatives pass by to support your favorite coffee store, restaurant or clothing store. Explore the possibility of starting a collaboration with an offline store. This target group of retailers are having a hard time and by working together you can on the one hand increase your turnover and on the other hand broaden your target group. Think for example of expanding your product range or offering discounts on certain products of a local company, which you then deliver.

Tip 10: Don’t keep selling out
Wijnand Jongen, director at Thuiswinkel.org appeals to (web)stores and brand manufacturers to postpone sales until after June 1, 2020. “To further relieve the pressure on the (return) chain. Given the pressure in the entire chain, at webshops, distribution centers and carriers, we consider it unwise to put products on sale now. That way we can continue to guarantee that people can continue to receive their products at a fair price,” says Wijnand Jongen. Link 1Link 2Link 3Link 4Link 5
Link 6Link 7Link 8Link 9Link 10Link 11undefined